The new Fedora 15 is released and people start to really get a feel of the new Gnome shell 3.0. But not the developers as they are working hard on the next major version 3.2 of the redesigned desktop. One of the changes is that there could be a world clock that is coming to gnome shell. One of the Google summer of coders this year, a person called ‘Stéphane Maniaci’ is working on improving the current incarnation of the clock menu. The new clock is supposedly will have capabilities to display times from different locations.


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Please find some of the mockups below that are being discussed currently.

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The last one is my favourite. I really hope this get implemented, even though all of them are really slick and looking nice.

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Please remember that these are not ‘just another’ mockups. These are actively discussed and one of these or a variation of these is going to land in Gnome 3.2 shell.

Weather applet also comes back to the gnome 3.2 shell!

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27 responses »

  1. Nux says:

    Yeah, nice. Bring back the weather app! :)

  2. GregE says:

    The weather app is back, it just needs manual installation

    https://github.com/simon04/gnome-shell-extension-weather

    Download source, unzip and copy folder to /usr/share/gnome-shell/extensions

    You need to find your Yahoo weather code and edit the source file

    No compiling, just restart the shell.
    :)

  3. [...] Ready for Gnome 3.2? The Shell gets world clock The new Fedora 15 is released and people start to really get a feel of the new Gnome shell 3.0. But not the developers as they are working hard on the next major version 3.2 of the redesigned desktop. One of the changes is that there could be a world clock that is coming to gnome shell. One of the Google summer of coders this year, a person called ‘Stéphane Maniaci’ is working on improving the current incarnation of the clock menu. The new clock is supposedly will have capabilities to display times from different locations. [...]

  4. [...] the world clock, its time for another feature that is added to the 3.2 arsenal of the ‘awesome’ [...]

  5. Foo says:

    I’m really baffled at why features like this are such a big deal. In other development environments (android and web being the two I will vouch for here), the updates being described here could be implemented over the weekend (with tests, ready to ship).

    So why is this such a big deal? It is also sad that this is such a big deal for users. Expectations have been set very low.

    I previously would have felt the same way but my understandings was that these gnome3 features were written in javascript and that the gui itself was styled using something like CSS3.

    So what’s the big deal? Is all gnome front end development being done by one intern? Or is development in gnome still really that hard?

    Seems very unfortunate.

    • my thoughts exactly, it’s a world clock, windows 95 had lots of world clock apps, why are we expected to get exciting over something so trivial and basic.

      I’m sure to the developer it’s something to be proud of, but as part of the larger picture, it’s like squashing a single cockroach when you are surrounded by thousands……

  6. I just want an official way to sync Google Calendars with Gnome calendar (without Evolution. Evolution is bloated and just needs to die)

  7. One of the problems with “the linux community” is this article, you seem to be excited about a world clock, when it’s actually such a boring, uniniteresting topic and piece of software that it should already exist and nobody should get excited about.

    What next? we’re going to get a power off button in the shell panel and somebody will keel over and die with ectasy?

    • vjjustin says:

      As I see it, the problem to the linux community or open source community is people take everything as granted.

      Did you get excited when your child first said ‘daddy’?
      When he or she first started to walk?
      When he or she first smiled at you?

      There is nothing to get excited about an operating system, If you ask me. There is nothing ‘turning the world upside down feature’ about an OS.

      But this is our child. I love open source and this is the first time I see a really beautiful and planned default open source OS I have seen. I know there are issues, but that doesn’t mean that you cannot be excited about feature which you really care about.

      I am proud to be part of open source and closely watch the development. I do get excited about features like these. As I said, in my view the problem to ‘the linux community’ is that they get excited only when kernel support 20,000 cpus or when the development takes more than a weekends effort to develop.

      But for me, I get excited every time my child smiles at me, even after making a stupid mistake, I don’t know why but I get really excited.

      • I really understand your point, but I can’t help but thinking how many world clocks are we going to build before somebody says it’s the last one and we should do something more important.

        from your singular point of view, I totally understand what you’re meaning to say.

        from a global 15+ years looking at the community pov, I shake my head and close the window on my firefox/macbook desktop cause 15 years from now, you’ll all be getting excited over a world clock that somebody else wrote.

        my point isn’t to destroy yours, but put it into perspective, I know it’s great to see your child smile, but after a while it gets boring to watch your baby home videos, I want to watch something more interesting and I don’t see that happening.

        • vjjustin says:

          When I first used a linux desktop (redhat 9), my initial reaction was ‘what a piece of shit, why would someone want to use that?’ I never used that even after installing it on my pc let alone showing someone else. That was ugly, looked like a cheap rip off of windows. (I am not talking about the features, which I did not care about back then)

          This is the first time in my experience I see a planned and beautiful desktop setup ever in open source world that do not look like a windows rip off. Even ubuntu was never this good to look at. I am not ahsamed anymore to show my desktop to others.

          So, there is change and innovation as I see it. But again thats my point. But I can understand your frustration as well.

          • you’re right, whilst I shrug my shoulders at “yet another world clock” I’m happy that it didn’t clone somebody else’s work in the process and looks attractive.

            I think both our points of view are valid tbh, thanks for letting me share mine.

      • sensei2.6.39 says:

        “As I said, in my view the problem to ‘the linux community’ is that they get excited only when kernel support 20,000 cpus or when the development takes more than a weekends effort to develop.”

        Wow, fail your logic course at University?

        First off, I’d argue that the only “Linux Community” that matters are the devs, and those who help the devs with translations, testing, bug reports, patches etc. etc. etc. If you aren’t contributing, you aren’t part of the community, full stop. Take a look at the GNU software collection recently? There are a lot more application developers, and associated support than there are kernel devs and associated support.

        Second, if you want to include users (which makes NO sense, but for arguments sake…) well it’s pretty clear the largest user group is Ubuntu. The average Ubuntu user doesn’t give a rats about the kernel, those that even know what it is. The average Ubuntu user is like your average Microsoft user. Your average Ubuntu user is as excited about the changes in the kernel as your average windows user was with the change to BCD.

        So who makes up this hypothetical Linux Community of yours? Because you certainly haven’t characterized the devs, or the single largest user group…

        As for a world clock, who cares? I don’t need someone to write code for something I can do on the fly in my head. As a developer, I think it is a wonderful coding exercise, beats hell out of Hello World, and it’s closer to real world coding demands than any example program I’ve read, but that’s it.

        The skill here is in the aesthetics, not the world clock. Don’t we have more than enough form over function software?

        I’ll make one exception. If this world clock:
        - determines if the RTC is using localtime.
        - determines if the system multi-boots
        - determines if any of the multi-booting systems are Windows
        - determines if any of those Windows variants can use UTC
        - makes the appropriate registry change in the Windows registration
        - does all of the above without user interaction

        Well if this world clock does all that, then I withdraw my contempt. That would be a useful world clock, because it would end up in more machines using UTC on their RTC (which is a *good* thing) without borking the windows installations of users who wouldn’t know (or care) which time is running on the RTC.

        So what that it looks good, between Ubuntu and Microsoft, there is more than enough form ahead of function code in the world.

        • vjjustin says:

          I sympathise over your efforts to sound smart. But you failed miserably.
          First you start with a cheap statement about my logic being wrong. Then in your comments you failed to mention why that is wrong.

          Your entire comment consisted of two parts; one a qn about what community I am speaking about and your definition of community. The second is your only argument that is aesthetics interests programmers only when a major functionality supports it.

          That was the entire point of my argument which you started with. (Just to clarify, lets talk about the community of contributors.) There are two underlying assumptions in my argument. 1) The linux eco system will grow only when ‘the community’ start to care about what the end user really wants. 2) The programmers care only about functionality that could give them challenges which, even you say, the end users might not care about.

          Your argument is just repeating and proving the second assumption of my argument. What you had to do, if you wanted to prove my logic failed, is prove that assumption as wrong. But you did the opposite. So now I have a proof for one of my assumption. Now what exactly is logic-less is you didn’t even understand what my argument was about. The person I ‘replied to’ understood it and you can read his reply.

          So may be you lack basic comprehension skills. or lack basic communication skills. Best of luck

  8. Rodislav Moldovan says:

    Nice mockups, but clock’s design.. please, don’t do this, is super hard to see something when text is small and there more than 1 clock visible..

  9. Iztok says:

    I like it ;)

    I don’t really understand the reactions of some people who don’t see those changes in Gnome 3 as evolution. They want everything to just work out of the box – the boring way.

    Linux and Gnome are alive ;)))

    They are changing and I as a user am watching how it develops. And I like it. Keep on with the good work. I am writing this in Gnome 3 shell I am looking forward to this clock …

  10. graylion says:

    why choose between diferent appearances now? make it user configurable.

  11. kiwi says:

    I just discovered that I no longer have a world clock after upgrading to Fedora 15

    Some of us do work over multiple time zones and it is kind of a basic feature that was in Gnome for several years.

    Bring it back quick =:-D

  12. Gazza says:

    Disappointed of discovering that such a basic feature disappeared and we need to wait a gnome release to have it back. Who knows when Fedora 15 will bring it in? Will I need to upgrade the system to get it back?

    Not a nice way to convince old users that the new gnome is really better for us.

  13. mgdn says:

    something like this please.. : http://www.qlock.com/
    There are many folks with loved ones on the other side of planet. something like this will be great..

    Again – Great work. love G3+

  14. qzjul says:

    Why exactly is it so hard to just *EXACTLY REPLICATE* the gnome 2 world clock?

    Where is the weather for each city? Where is the world map with dark/light indications? How can this be so hard to re-do? Nobody wants clocks with broken-number-train-station style numbers: they want clocks they can read, and that have the features they want.

    Like time & weather in the top
    Different locations (with Weather!)
    A world map with dark/light indicators

    And please the ability to add UNIX era as well ;)

    • Aldi says:

      I fully agree to qzjul. The world clock in Gnome 2 was beautiful. Just paint it in the black colours of Gnome 3 and that’s it. Would be perfect.

  15. wilo says:

    Gnome 3.4 has been released, and this is still missing :(

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